The Squealing Tire

Tire Talk from the Experts at Discount Tire Company.

The Squealing Tire - Tire Talk from the Experts at Discount Tire Company.

Discount Tire Goes to Ouray – FJ Summit 2011 (Part 1)

Part 1 of experiencing the 2011 FJ Summit Event. Ride along with Discount Tire as they experience one of the most scenic off road events of the year, the FJ Summit. “What an unbelievable event this year turned out to be. There were over 250 FJ Cruisers that filled the little town of Ouray also known as the Switzerland of the United States. Everywhere you looked there were decked out FJ’s with every imaginable gadget available and then some. I was absolutely amazed at the wide array of parts on all the vehicles. Everyone was excited and willing to share their knowledge on how their rigs worked and what they did to make them even better.”

Discount Tire Goes to Ouray – FJ Summit 2011 (Part 2)

Part 2 of Experiencing the FJ Summit 2011. Follow Discount Tire as they explore Black Bear Pass in the scenic Rocky Mountains of Colorado. “Today is the first official day of the FJ Summit Event so we needed to be up early and get to the staging area over by the Natural Spring swimming pool. We are sponsoring a trail ride each day and today’s trail is Black Bear. Unfortunately the trail is still snowed in at the summit.”

Discount Tire Goes to Ouray – FJ Summit 2011 (Part 3)

Part 3 of Experiencing the 2011 FJ Summit. Follow along as Discount Tire explores Colorado’s Alpine loop. “We were up early again to meet everyone taking the trail we sponsored today called Alpine loop. This is one of the longer trails at about 65 miles. It seemed everyone at the event was up early and eager for another adventurous day on the old mining roads in the San Juan Mountains.”

Bias Ply Tires and Radial Tires… What’s what? What’s right for me?

ATV/UTV Bias Ply Tires VS. Radial ATV/UTV Tires. What is what and what is right for me? Here we explain the ins and outs of both Radial Tires and Bias Ply tires, including construction, Pros and Cons, and a summary that helps make it all easy to understand. “If you are shopping for a new ATV/UTV tire you’ve probably found that there are many, many options to choose from. Some are Bias ply, some are radial. We’ll do our best to explain what’s what here so you can decide what will be best for you.”

Bias and Radial ATV/UTV Tire Test

Testing the DWT Moapa Bias Ply Tire and the Maxxis Bighorn Radial Ply tire. Discount Tire and TomCar hit the Arizona Desert to experience what each tire can do. “We had a unique opportunity to test the DWT Moapa Bias ply tire and the Maxxis Bighorn Radial ply tire in the smoldering heat of the Arizona desert. Here’s how it went.”

The Skinny on Hub Centric Rings

The Skinny on Hub Centric Rings

We frequently see questions regarding hub centric rings so we decided to put this article together to help answer some of your questions.

First, some terms you will need to know.

  • “Hub Pilot” – Hub Pilot refers to the center of your vehicle’s axle in which your wheel rotates around.
  • “Hub Centric Wheels” – Hub centric wheels have a center bore that matches the vehicle’s hub pilot.
  • “Non Hub Centric Wheels” – Non hub centric wheels have a larger center bore than the vehicles hub pilot.

What are hub centric rings?

Hub centric rings, typically made of plastic or metal, are designed and used to fill the gap between the hub pilot of the vehicle and the center bore of the wheel.

Here’s what the hub pilot, the center bore of a wheel, and hub centric rings look like:

What purpose do hub centric rings serve?

A hub centric ring’s sole purpose is to help align and center the wheel and tire assembly on the vehicle’s hub pilot.  Once the wheel assembly is torqued, the hub centric ring’s job is complete.  Hub rings help reduce and can eliminate wheel and tire vibrations caused during installation. Hub rings do not carry any load.

Do all wheels need hub centric rings?

No, not all wheels need hub centric rings.

Wheels that are “Hub Centric” for the vehicle will fit over the vehicles hub pilot without any gap.  All original equipment and some aftermarket wheels are hub centric but most aftermarket wheels are not hub centric.

Wheels that are “Non Hub Centric” can be mounted without hub rings if the proper time and care it taken to center the wheel on the vehicle’s hub during installation.

I read that you have to run hub centric rings on non hub centric wheels or the lug nuts/studs will break do to extra load. Is this true?

This is not the case.  The vehicle’s hub pilot, studs, and lug nuts are not load bearing.  What actually holds a wheel on the vehicle is the clamping force that is created once the lug nuts are torqued to specifications set by the vehicle manufacturer.

How are hub centric rings sized?

Hub centric rings are sized by the outer diameter to inner diameter.  The outer diameter is the hub bore of the wheel and the inner diameter is the hub pilot on the vehicle.

Here’s an example:

The hub pilot on a 2000 Nissan Altima is 66.1mm. The hub bore on the 17×7 Konig Unknown (a popular wheel for this application) is 73.1mm.  From looking at the hub pilot and hub bore specs, we know there is a 7mm. gap. To fill this gap a hub centric ring is used.  The correct ring size for this particular application is 73.1(Outer Diameter) to 66.1(Inner Diameter).

Which material is better, aluminum or plastic?

There is a lot of debate on which material is best and there are Pros and Cons to both. Here’s our take on the subject.

If you live in an area where snow and road salt is present, or in an area around the ocean, plastic rings are best used.  Unlike the metal aluminum rings, the plastic rings will not oxidize and corrode.

If you push your vehicle to the limits and are constantly on the brakes, like when road racing for example, a metal hub centric ring is best used.  Contrary to what you may read, under heavy braking or racing situations, plastic rings can deteriorate from the heat being generated.  The heat can break down the plastic material making it brittle which can ultimately lead to the ring braking.  Although very rare and only under very extreme conditions, the plastic ring can melt and deform.

If your vehicle is mainly used as a daily driver, pick one and go with it, either one will get the job done.

 

Matt Johnson
Discount Tire Co.

LT Tires and How They Work

LT Tires explained. Here Discount Tire covers everything you need to know about LT tires. From defining metric and high floatation size systems to breaking each rating down in an easy to understand format. “Ever wonder when reading tire reviews with complaints about “squishy” or “slow responding” traits….Is the tire to blame or was it the size the user decided to run? Did this driver upgrade from a stock tire with a 80psi max pressure to a larger tire with a 65psi max?

These questions pop into my mind time and time again and the answer is not always in the consumer review.”

Wheel Offset and Backspace – How Do They Relate?

 Wheel Offset and Backspace Explained

Wheel Offset and backspace are essentially two different ways of looking at the same thing. They determine the location of the wheel and tire assembly when bolted to the vehicles hub (how far in – tucked, or how far out they will sit).

Wheel Offset is the measured distance between the hub mounting surface and the wheels center line.

With X being the determined offset, the hub mounting surface on positive offset wheels is X amount forward from the wheel center line. The hub mounting surface on negative offset wheels is X amount backwards from the wheel center line. The hub mounting surface on 0 offset wheels is the wheel center line.

Wheel Backspacing is the measurement from the hub mounting surface to the back edge of the wheel.

Typically speaking, the higher the offset/backspace, the more the wheel will tuck inward towards the suspension or away from the fender. The lower the offset/backspace, the more the wheel will push out away from the suspension or towards the fender.

For Example:

  • If the offset on a 9″ wide wheel is +12 mm, the hub mounting surface will be 12 mm forward from the wheels center line. Measuring from the hub mounting surface to the back edge of the wheel, the backspacing is 5.5″.
  • If the offset on a 9″ wide wheel is -12 mm, the hub mounting surface will be 12 mm towards the back of the wheel from the wheels center line. Measuring from the hub mounting surface to the back edge of the wheel, the backspacing is 4.5″.

Here’s how to calculate the backspacing using the rim width and offset:

First – add 1″ to the rim width and then divide by 2 to find the wheels center line (you have to account for the wheel flange which is why you add 1″ to the rim width). Second – convert the offset which is in millimeters into inches (there is 25.4 mm in 1 inch so divide the offset by 25.4). Lastly – add the converted offset to the wheels center line (if the offset is positive) for the correct backspacing or subtract the converted offset to the wheels center line (if the offset is negative) for the correct backspacing.

For Example:

17×9 +12 mm offset

  • 9″ rim width + 1″ = 10″
  • 10″/2 = 5″ (wheels center line)
  • +12 mm offset/25.4 = 0.47″ (0.50″ rounded up)
  • 0.50″ + 5″ = 5.50″ Backspace

17×9 -12 mm offset

  • 9″ rim width + 1″ = 10″
  • 10″/2 = 5″ (wheels center line)
  • -12 mm offset/25.4 = 0.47″ (0.50″ rounded up)
  • 0.50″ – 5″ = 4.50″ Backspace

*Please note that the wheels center line is the backspacing for 0 offset wheels*